"Nipper the Dog we all know"

History of Analog Recording, from before Edison to the current day.

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"Nipper the Dog we all know"

Postby Arny » Mon Jan 04, 2010 3:35 pm

This Book is published & Printed in my Hometown by The Talking Machine Review, 19 Glendale Road, Bournemouth BH6 4JA, England.
Sadly it is no longer available new, I purchased it many years ago but I understand that there are some used copy’s available.
I have not written what is below, all I have done is scanned 16 of the pages from the book, and then OCR’d them to take up less space.
I did think about editing it down a bit but changed my mind as I don’t think it would be right, after all the original publisher was happy with the length.
This first Post is from the 1st three pages
This part of the Book below is written by Frank Andrews

"HIS MASTER'S VOICE"
THE DISCOVERY OF THE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING THE ORIGINAL PAINTING

By Frank Andrews
It has always been well known that Francis Barraud's original picture of "His Master's Voice" depicted 'Nipper', the dog, apparently listening to a cylinder record on a recording capable phonograph and not to the familiar gramophone.
For me, the title the artist gave to the original has always seemed more suitable than ever it did when applied to the altered picture with the gramophone, I say this for the simple reason that a phonograph was not only a reproducer, it was also a recorder of sounds and the owner of such a Talking Machine was enabled to make recordings in the confines of his home, much the same as the possessor of a Tape Recording Machine may do today, Therefore, it follows that the phonograph was the more likely instrument to reproduce an ordinary person's voice than the gramophone, For the dog to be listening to His Master's Voice on the gramophone it would require that His Master was a recording artist or His Master had privately recorded his voice at a recording studio.

On 21st,October, l972, I probably became the first person for 74 years to see Francis Barraud's photograph of his original painting, let me tell you how this came about.
I am presently engaged in researching the Talking Machine Industry of Great Britain and one of the tools of my trade is the “Trade Marks Journal” published weekly by the Board of Trade through H,M, Stationery Office. In the Autumn of 1972, I was introduced to Leonard Petts, the author of this history of the picture, whom I knew to be preparing a book about the labels used on The Gramophone Company records.
During the course of our conversation I enquired if he would like to make use of the Trade Marks data which I had been accumulating over the previous two years, There followed some discussion during which Mr, Petts asked if I knew that Francis Barraud had, in fact, Registered his original picture, submitting a photograph of it with his Application for Registration. This I did not know, which was exciting news in itself, and in the excitement I mistook Mr. Petts' remarks to mean that the artist had put forward his picture for Registration as a Trade Mark, although I knew of no business operations with which Francis Barraud was connected.

At my first opportunity, I researched the Trade Marks Journal again, working backwards in time from the already known Application of the altered picture submitted by the Gramophone Company, all was to no avail, bitterly disappointed I had to admit to myself that the hoped for illustration was not there.
Further conversation with Mr. Petts revealed that I had misunderstood him and that Francis Barraud had Registered his original painting at Stationer's Hall, copyrighting it as a "Work of Art".

My next move was to ascertain that the photograph did still exist. A key piece of information was to discover the date on which Francis Barraud's Application for Copyright had been filed, otherwise it would be a matter of diligently searching through months and months, perhaps years and years of Copyright Applications in the "Works of Art" files, trying to discover the intriguing photograph. Fortunately, Mr. Petts was able to supply this vital piece of information, and I was eager to follow this up at the first opportunity.

On 16th,October, l972,I had a Premium day's holiday from work and hide myself off to the Public Records Office in London, where I applied for a Temporary Reader's Ticket. With the assistance of the Supervisor, I soon established that Barraud's copyright Application had been filed and was still in existence; The question was,
"Was the photograph still with the application form?
as with many old documents, the copyright Applications were not housed in the Public Records Office, but would be brought in from the country where they were stored. I Was promised I could have them for inspection by the coming Saturday.
Knowing the month and the year in which the Application had been made played safe by ordering Applications for Copyright for one month previous to and two months later than the month specified.

Working in a factory is a frightful bore at the best of times, but the next four days
seemed to drag out interminably.
At last it was Saturday, I arrived at the Public Records Office in the morning just as it opened. I presented my ticket to one of the stewards and explained that there should be four boxes of "Works of Art" Copyright Applications awaiting my inspection. The man went away and after a short spell of time returned saying that he could find nothing earmarked for me. The Supervisor came over, and I having explained the situation, he proceeded to thumb through some slips on his desk and then suggested to the Steward that the boxes might have been left in the Long Room, I was beginning to feel frustrated!.

Eventually the man returned clutching four boxes and the adrenalin began to flow!. Trying unsuccessfully to keep calm, I chose a desk at which to examine the contents of the boxes, I chose the box, which if our information was correct, was the most likely to contain what I was hoping to find.
The box was bound with white tape which I untied, then I removed the lid and proceeded to take out the Applications within, one by one, placing them in the lid in the order in which I found them. Every Application was marked with a rubber stamp of Stationer's Hall which shoved the date of filing, I soon realised that the box had probably never been opened since the day it had received the last of that particular month's Applications,' 74 years ago!.

The Applications were prescribed forms to which were attached samples or photographs of the objects which were to be copyrighted. I quickly passed over, en bloc, all Applications made previous to the day I wanted. Excitement was increasing within me, would it be there? it should be among the next few forms which tantalisingly were face downwards in the box, I now had to turn each one separately. Cocoa; Cotton Thread; Perfumery; Soft Drinks; and then a whole range of clothing designs from a tailor, showing dress suit a, Sporting wear; Fishing outfits; Cycling clothes; etc,,etc, . , , , , would they never end?
Suddenly, THERE IT WAS!!! The photograph of the original painting showing the terrier 'Nipper', apparently listening to a phonograph.

But what model or make of phonograph was it? I had come armed with as many illustrations of phonographs as I possessed, One sheet of Edison machines, printed by The Cylinder Division of 'Thomas A,Edison,Inc,' of Orange, New Jersey, I hoped might have provided the answer, but none of
them was at all similar to that in the photograph, neither were any of the few illustrations I had of Columbia machines, so what was it? Had Francis Barraud taken artistic liberty?.
My researches into the Talking Machine Industry have been confined to the disc record and my knowledge of machines, both phonographs and gramophones, is of a very low order.

"Oh well", I thought," if I do not determine the make and model of the phonograph, someone else will, but I will attempt it myself. "Careful study of the phonograph had shown me that, from the Dog's point of view, things were not as they should be, the cylinder mandrel with its loading gate was at the left and the feed screw to the right. I knew this was not the usual arrangement, but if the horn were to be rotated through 180 degrees this would bring everything into line with other phonographs, My conclusion was that 'Nipper' is shown facing the rear of the machine with the horn pointing away from the front, another feature was that I could see no inlet for a winding handle.

When I received my copy of the photograph at home, which was about eight weeks later, I still had not discovered the identity of the machine, with the photograph to refer to, I was now able to investigate more fu1ly.
In the December,1965,issue of the 'Hillandale News'
(the magazine of the City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society)
was re-printed a leaflet of 1893 showing the 'Commercial Phonograph, as advertised by 'The Edison Bell Corporation Ltd.', of Edison House, Northumberland Avenue, London.
This machine was manufactured by The Edison Works in the United States and was made primarily as a Dictaphone, its commercial advantage being that it was cheaper to use one of these machines than it was to employ a stenographer, i,e., a shorthand typist.
A horn was not provided, instead, connected to the reproducer was a hollow tube which surrounded almost the whole of the cabinet work at the top, into this tube could be inserted up to as many as eight sets of hearing tubes, the main tube being disconnected from the reproducer when a recording was to be made and a Speaking device substituted. The machine was battery operated.

Comparing this instrument with that in the photograph, it was apparent that either this or a similar model was the machine which Francis Barraud had painted, The listening distribution tube was there; there was no winding handle required; the connection from the reproducer would allow for a horn to be rotated, or fitted, through a large angle, the arrangement of the pulley guard; on / off switch and many other features make it almost certain that the machine is "The Commercial Phonograph". The only question remaining is the identification of the horn.
That the photograph of the original painting had lain in a box without disturbance for seventy-four years and that I was the one to bring it into the light of day once more has been one of the most exciting and satisfying events of my life. It is a marvelous coincidence that the publication of this picture and the stories surrounding it takes place during the year in which The Gramophone Company, known to most people as "HIS MASTER'S VOICE", will be celebrating the seventy-fifth anniversary of its foundation,
Frank Andrews

This below is written by the Publishers
Some of the material included in this book has been extracted from the forthcoming book by Leonard Petts on "75 Years of the Berliner; G & T ; Pre-Dog and His Master's Voice Label", which it is hoped will be.

We are grateful to Mr, Peter Morgan of the Hendon Camera Club who photographed for us Francis Barraud's 'Reid's Stout' advertisements. Some difficulty was experienced because the originals could not be removed from their frames without spoiling them. Slight reflections upon the glass are therefore seen.

F 0 R E W 0 R D
The discovery of a photograph, believed to have been taken by Francis Barraud, of his original painting His Master's Voice' showing Nipper the dog, looking at and listening to a phonograph, is exciting news.
Coming as it does at the beginning of The Gramophone Company's seventy-fifth year it seems appropriate that the story of the painting should be re-examined. In the following pages a newly written history, based upon letters and documents of the period which place many dates exactly for the first time, endeavourer to tell as far as it is now possible to do, the complete story. The greatest care has been taken to present the facts correctly and considerable research has been carried out to this end, Where it was impossible to produce documentary proof of certain facts, the evidence existing is quoted and examined. If any reader is able to throw light on these points I should be grateful to hear from him.
I am very grateful to E,M,I, for permission to quote from letters and publications and for the photographs used to illustrate the article. The reproduction of the copy of the photograph of Barraud's original "His Master's Voice" painting, showing the dog looking at, and listening to a phonograph, the original of which is in the Crown copyright records in the Public Records Office, appears by permission of the Keeper of the Public Records Office and the Comptroller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office,
To all other editors and authors who have allowed me to quote from their publications, thus enriching this chronicle, I also offer my thanks.
Every effort has been made to trace the owners of the copyright of any item quoted and to ask permission for their use. Should anyone owning such rights not have been contacted, I offer my sincere apologies and trust that they will pardon the omission.
Special thanks are due to Swantje Postlethwaite who has designed the cover and border decorations used throughout this booklet,
Leonard Petts

I will continue with the rest of the story in the next Post, in the meantime I will call the Publisher to see if there are any new copy's in Existance or whether they plan a re-issue.

Best Regards,

Tony.

The Original Painting of Nipper on his own
Just Nipper.JPG

Nipper with Edison Phonograph
Nipper Edison.JPG

Nipper with Gramophone
Nipper Gramophone.JPG
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Re: "Nipper the Dog we all know"

Postby dbbubba » Mon Jan 04, 2010 10:12 pm

Tony.... that is a fascinating article!

I have looked at that picture so many times over the years and never really ever studied it.
I probably would have passed over that picture of Nipper that you found at Pete's Pawn Shop, too.
Danny Brown
(I was going call myself Mr. B because I like people to say "MISTER" when they say my name, but then I pitied the fools.)
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Re: "Nipper the Dog we all know"

Postby Arny » Tue Jan 05, 2010 1:18 am

dbbubba wrote:I have looked at that picture so many times over the years and never really ever studied it.
I probably would have passed over that picture of Nipper that you found at Pete's Pawn Shop, too.


Dear Danny,
My mother told me, that when I was about two years old, I would pick-up an old 78, just to study that picture, she even took me to see the real one at the HMV Offices in Oxford St, London, just before WW2. yet at that time I did not have a clue that it was anything to do with music,
Not much later I did find out of course, and it still remains my favourite piece of Art.

My relations and friends are always buying me things to do with that Picture from miniature Gramophones to various size Nippers I have many enamelled wall plates, I even have a French Rubber Stamp that came from the French HMV Office

Yes what a memory you have, I got the Large Picture that hangs on my control room wall when I was working with you in Dallas, I also managed to get a tiny "Nipper" Salt & Pepper set in another Antique Shop while I was there.

I'm glad you have enjoyed the post so far, there is more to come in this fascinating Story of Nipper.


Best Regards,

Tony.
Salt & Pepper.JPG
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Re: "Nipper the Dog we all know"

Postby THEMIXFIX » Tue Jan 05, 2010 3:38 am

Tony:

I USED to have an RCA "Nipper" lapel pin I'd constantly wear on my jacket (Amongst others like a "Miniature" U-67, of which I have a GREAT story about; but I'll leave that for another time), and a little "Record Man" in a top hat. Unfortunately, I can't find any of them anymore, (although I DO know what happened to the U-67 pin...)
Image
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Re: "Nipper the Dog we all know"

Postby dbbubba » Tue Jan 05, 2010 6:39 pm

THEMIXFIX wrote:I can't find any of them anymore, (although I DO know what happened to the U-67 pin...) Image


That sounds like on of THOSE stories!
Danny Brown
(I was going call myself Mr. B because I like people to say "MISTER" when they say my name, but then I pitied the fools.)
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Re: "Nipper the Dog we all know"

Postby THEMIXFIX » Wed Jan 06, 2010 8:49 am

Tony:

Actually, I'll have to leave certain things up to the reader's imagination for EVERYONE'S safety!!

The were some "shady" characters who had some problems having their records (musical) seized by the Government in NJ in the late 70s early 1980s.

After some "bargaining" with the Government, there was some sort of "deal" worked out, where some new recordings had to be done under the financial supervision of the Government.

Now, I happened to have a client who was a "Club Kid", and recorded with me 3-4 times a week. He had NO cash flow problems, because of his "main" business.

He, in turn, had a Lawyer who was supposed to "hook him up" in the Music Business, but I believe he just hooked up the Lawyer with his "product".

Anyway, somehow, this Lawyer was appointed by a Record Company to look over their funds, when a "Hip Hop Producer" was hired to save the company, but just ended up bringing ALL his "crew" to work on board at VERY nice salaries.

So, now, the Lawyer had to get rid of them all, and bring his own people in to produce a recording with a "Star" he had given to him by a "different" kind of crew who "Wanted ta make da kid a Star". Image

So, all dese guys met at dis studio, where the Lawyer made the pitch for some finances to make this all possible, and hear dis kid "sing".

Afterwords, we were all invited to Queens, where the kid's "family" owned a restaurant to celebrate.

Oh yes, I must mention I was chosen to be da Engineer of dis project.

To make an incredibly long story a bit shorter, after WAY too much food at the restaurant, an "older" Gentleman came and started a conversation with me. Remember, the original topic of this post was my U-67 lapel pin. Image

The Lawyer immediately came to my rescue by saying, "Oh look Bob, he likes your pin!!", taking it off of my jacket, and putting it on the older Gentleman's' lapel.

The old guy just smiled, and then shook my hand and went to talk to someone else.

It seems he thought the mic was a REAL one. Image

I bought the Lawyer MANY drinks that night, helping him to get laid, I hope.
Image
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Re: "Nipper the Dog we all know"

Postby dbbubba » Wed Jan 06, 2010 9:17 pm

BOB!

Are you sure you are not describing the episode from the Dick Van Dyke show where Rob and the crew (Mory Amsterdam and Rose Marie) had to write material for the son of the "boss" who wanted to be in show business?
After they wrote a show for him the arranged for the guy to have a show at a restaurant like you describe and he was horrible.
The whole "family" was there.
Dick Van Dyke (Rob) and the other writers were thinking for sure that they were going to get cement shoes over it all.
It turned out that the "boss" wanted them to write the material so the kid would see that even with the best writers money could buy he was still going to be hopeless failure and didn't belong in show business.

Still, your U-67 mic lapel pin loss is sad, but also VERY funny!
Wasn't funny then was it?

I scored a TASCAM Model 10 console for $500 back in '76 thanks to my "family" connections while I was in Washington DC.
I had bought the console from a guy here in Dallas and was paying him out.
I was up in Washington DC playing at club/restaurant in a show band and had the console there as well.
The guy who I was buying the console from decided he needed the money RIGHT AWAY instead of in installments live we agreed upon.
So, he decided to drive up there to collect the rest of the money or the console (actually he was from that area.)
He barged into the club/restaurant while we were gone one day and was demanding enough that he was directed to the "owner of the joint."
When I arrived later that day the "owner of the joint" wanted to talk to me.
Uh, oh.....:shock:

I went up to his office and he explained what had taken place.
The guy I was buying the console from showed up made a few "demands" and the "boss" told him to take $250.00 and never come back.
He even made him sign a piece of paper that said it was final sale!
The "boss"' told me that I owed him $250.00.
I borrowed it as an advance for that week from the band leader and paid the "boss" off and said "Thank you."
Mysteriously $250 was what I made per week.
I think I recall that the "boss" said, "Always take care of your debts."

So, I got a $2500.00 console fr $500.00!

I never really knew who this guy was, but I only knew he was (A.) a lawyer and (B.) a member of THE FAMILY.
Danny Brown
(I was going call myself Mr. B because I like people to say "MISTER" when they say my name, but then I pitied the fools.)
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Re: "Nipper the Dog we all know"

Postby Arny » Thu Jan 07, 2010 4:54 pm

THEMIXFIX wrote:Tony:

I USED to have an RCA "Nipper" lapel pin I'd constantly wear on my jacket (Amongst others like a "Miniature" U-67, of which I have a GREAT story about; but I'll leave that for another time), and a little "Record Man" in a top hat. Unfortunately, I can't find any of them anymore, (although I DO know what happened to the U-67 pin...)

Dear Bob,
I'll add some more info on Lapel Pins mainly because some Lapel Pins have become part of our "Recording History" your U67 & RCA Pin's would be two good examples.

In 1980 the Olympics were held in Russia but due the the Russian Army marching into Afghanistan the year before.
LINK=
http://www.moscow-life.com/moscow/olympic-games

Ampex were to supply the recording gear & tapes for this great event, so therefore had 100's & 100's of tea cups made and labelled,
as well as 100's & 100's of Lapel or Tie Pins made.__Image

But they were thrown away or "Binned" as we Brits say, but I managed to get some cups & Pins for my Ampex Clients, I'm down to one cup now, and two pins as they are quite sought after due to the interesting historic background.

If the Tie/Lapel Pin Posts get busy I might move them to a new thread i.e called "Historic Tie/Lapel Pins" thread.

Best Regards,
Image
Tony.
1980 Olympic Tie Clips.JPG


1980 Olympic Cup.JPG
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