History of Recording

History of Analog Recording, from before Edison to the current day.

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Re: History of Recording

Postby Dualflip » Sun Mar 28, 2010 1:27 pm

Tony that video is one of the freakiest things ive ever seen, the faces appearing in the background while the guests are talking are just insane!
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Re: History of Recording

Postby abtech » Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:06 am

Dualflip wrote:Tony that video is one of the freakiest things ive ever seen, the faces appearing in the background while the guests are talking are just insane!


Looks like the ghost of David Crosby . . .
Cheers,

Frank
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Re: History of Recording

Postby dbbubba » Tue May 18, 2010 8:27 am

I watched the entire six part series straight thru last night.

Fascinating stuff!

I had no idea that they were so primitive in how they the whole studio was.
It might have actually been space age at the time, though.

I was also pretty interested to see/hear how the Dr. Who Theme was assembled.
I had listened to that them music for years and never really paid close attention to it.
Talk about starting from scratch.

I also like how the "old school" composers in the group disliked the introduction of the Moog and EMI Synthi synthesizers.
It seems that new technology and methods always upset the established people!
Danny Brown
(I was going call myself Mr. B because I like people to say "MISTER" when they say my name, but then I pitied the fools.)
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Re: History of Recording

Postby Dualflip » Wed May 19, 2010 12:55 am

Arny, your BBC documentary reminded me about this video, i cant recall when i saw it for the first time, but i think that you guys will appreciate it, this is what i call a "splicing nightmare", you can go and directly fast forward the first 30-40 seconds that are like "what the hell is going on here?", but the rest of the video is just insane....

Enjoy

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Re: History of Recording

Postby brianroth » Wed May 19, 2010 1:50 am

Dear Jose,

I have shown that video a BUNCH of times to friends and clients...LOL. It shows what we USED to do before DAWs.....

"When Men Were Men and Sheep Were Nervous..."

lol

What a great bunch of tape chopping......

Best,

Bri
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Re: History of Recording

Postby klett » Wed May 19, 2010 7:46 am

responding to the ISI Tempophon post...

The ISI pitch changer, or time expander/compressor, was the analog tape precursor to the delay line based Harmonizer. Tape would be played on a standard transport, like a Scully 280 deck, but the tape would be threaded through this device and around it's rotating scanner head. I am told this was tricky to operate.... there are a lot of variables. You had the tape speed through the unit, relative to the speed it was recorded at, vs the rate of rotation of the playback scanner drum... it sounded choppy and bad if you didn't get it adjusted right but if you took the time it worked. So it was pretty much like an analog version of a 910 Harmonizer. With the 910 you would play tape into a 910 and that would flow through the delay line at one rate while it was being scanned in short snippets at another rate - conceptually the same thing as the ISI box. The 910 and others had an output to control tape machine speed. Few used it this way but the idea was that as you turned the pitch knob down the tape would speed up so that in the end you would be playing the tape faster but pitch would remain constant (time compression)... or the other way (speed down pitch up) to get time expansion

I believe the ISI was used on the voice of HAL 9000 in 2001 a Space Odyssey when he was being shut down... pitch and time were being distorted non proportionally (meaning pitch changed at a different rate than the speed) and at the time this was the only technology that could do it.

anyway, one of my clients used one of these back in the day when she was working at Gotham Recording, at the same address as you see on that cut-sheet, 2 W 46th street. I have never seen one - not many were made, they were horribly expensive.

oh! - and I see you downloaded this from Wendy's site... she showed me this in 1980 or '81 when I was helping her with Tron ... getting her M56 locate sync and resolve under control of a Fostex synchronizer

key word for this thing = commutator
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Re: History of Recording

Postby Dualflip » Wed May 19, 2010 11:22 pm

brianroth wrote:Dear Jose,

I have shown that video a BUNCH of times to friends and clients...LOL. It shows what we USED to do before DAWs.....

"When Men Were Men and Sheep Were Nervous..."

lol

What a great bunch of tape chopping......

Best,

Bri


Hey Bri

Its insane, I splice tape every now and then, but that is waaaaay too much. However it really makes me wonder and appreciate the fact that back in the day ppl really had to work and spend a great deal of time in order to do what we do today with just a mouse click.

I remember I was talking with an old school engineer here (Brian must be thinking, "well thats unusual" LOL) and we were discussing analog tape decks, and I was saying something like "Yeah i totally love analog decks, but you know nowadays everyone can buy a Protools system and they can..." while he suddenly interrupted me and continued with my phrase "... can make any random piece of shit".

However eventhou I love analog recording, theres no way im ever doing something like that!, my GF would kill me ! LOL :D :D

Best

Jose
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Re: History of Recording

Postby THEMIXFIX » Thu May 20, 2010 10:23 pm

Dualflip wrote:

I remember I was talking with an old school engineer here (Brian must be thinking, "well thats unusual" LOL) and we were discussing analog tape decks, and I was saying something like "Yeah i totally love analog decks, but you know nowadays everyone can buy a Protools system and they can..." while he suddenly interrupted me and continued with my phrase "... can make any random piece of shit".

Best

Jose


AMEN!!

I LOVED it when stuff was HARD to do and took TALENT!! :o

That includes Photography, Video and Movies and editing, Singing, Playing an Instrument, Art and Graphics, etc.

Remember that old quote about "Giving a thousand monkeys typewriters, and they would eventually come up with the Collective Works of Shakespeare?" ;)

Well, thanks to the Internet, we know this is NOT true... :roll: :mrgreen:
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Re: History of Recording

Postby Dualflip » Thu May 20, 2010 11:08 pm

THEMIXFIX wrote:
Remember that old quote about "Giving a thousand monkeys typewriters, and they would eventually come up with the Collective Works of Shakespeare?" ;)

Well, thanks to the Internet, we know this is NOT true... :roll: :mrgreen:


LOL yeah i remember hearing that quote many times, and you are right!, i actually think that you enhanced/rewrite that quote!, if i may i will use your version in the future :lol: :lol:
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Re: History of Recording

Postby THEMIXFIX » Fri May 21, 2010 9:15 am

Jose:

Please do!! ;)

Maybe millions of monkeys will get a chance to read it!! ;) :mrgreen:
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